I’ve been a little neglectful towards my blog over the last month or so, but I’m going to make sure I get back into the swing of blogging and uploading reviews/trailers. You’ve been warned. 

E. x

sweetheartsandcharacters:

R.I.P James Garner (April 7, 1928-July 19, 2014).


Times Square. Photographed by Frank Larson. (1954)
Times Square. Photographed by Frank Larson. (1954)

geofframscy:

notthebatman:

THAT MOMENT WHEN SEVEN CELEBRITIES CALL OUT ROBIN THICKE ON NATIONAL TELEVISION AND MAKE YOU FEEL LESS ALONE

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=htYOgDs6ROE&feature=kp

BOYHOOD (2014).
Director: Richard Linklater
Writer: Richard Linklater
Cast: Ellar Coltrane, Patricia Arquette, Ethan Hawke, Lorelai Linklater
Imdb Synopsis: The life of a young man, Mason, from age 5 to age 18
-
I don’t think you can deny the charm and ploy of the concept of Boyhood – a real live life flashing before your eyes: the innocence of youth and the awkward discoveries of your teens, all captured on film for the world to see; it’s a novel idea and one that sits nicely with Linklater; if anyone could convincingly sell this behemoth film then of course it would be the man who part steers the Before ship (and oh how I love that ship) – a set of films which also deal with the passing of time. I enjoyed it, despite its immeasurably long running time, but I don’t think I’m as blown away by it as everyone else seems to be. I can understand why it is a precious and historic film and how fresh and different it is; I instantly became attached to Mason and his family and his growth continued to surprise and enchant me – I recognised moments of pain, happiness and confusion from every one of the characters and watched as they crossed off the benchmark moments of life; education, drinking age, learning to drive, falling in love, graduation, moving out (etc.). The story of Mason’s parents and sister also added for the morality of life whereby you are constantly making choices and learning, never fully knowing what the outcome will be or where it will lead you –Linklater has an innate skill with his characters, he doesn’t just bring one dimension to the surface – he exposes them fully, wounds and all, and Patricia Arquette and regular collaborator Ethan Hawke were the perfect casting for the [humanly] flawed but loving parents. As brave as the move was in casting a young unknown boy whose future you couldn’t predict, it worked; Ellar Coltrane is brilliant and natural as Mason, laid back in a completely unassuming, inviting and altogether familiar way. 
In a mathematical sense it has all the right numbers and operations, quirky, heart warming and different beyond the measure of 12 years – an ageing and aiding soundtrack, brilliant performances and a universal storyline - I’m glad I got to share this cinematic experience with a cinema audience, but I’m saddened that I’m not quite as bowled over as I thought I would be…. I am however putting this down to the fact that this film doesn’t have a literal ending; Mason/Ellar’s boyhood may well be over – we leave him as a young man with a bright and brilliant future ahead of him, making this another beginning in the story of his life. I kind of wish I could be there to watch the next 12 years unfold.
It’s a bittersweet ending to a very sweet film.

Boy oh Boy - to - Man oh Man; 8 out of 10.

BOYHOOD (2014).

Director: Richard Linklater

Writer: Richard Linklater

Cast: Ellar Coltrane, Patricia Arquette, Ethan Hawke, Lorelai Linklater

Imdb Synopsis: The life of a young man, Mason, from age 5 to age 18

-

I don’t think you can deny the charm and ploy of the concept of Boyhood – a real live life flashing before your eyes: the innocence of youth and the awkward discoveries of your teens, all captured on film for the world to see; it’s a novel idea and one that sits nicely with Linklater; if anyone could convincingly sell this behemoth film then of course it would be the man who part steers the Before ship (and oh how I love that ship) – a set of films which also deal with the passing of time. I enjoyed it, despite its immeasurably long running time, but I don’t think I’m as blown away by it as everyone else seems to be. I can understand why it is a precious and historic film and how fresh and different it is; I instantly became attached to Mason and his family and his growth continued to surprise and enchant me – I recognised moments of pain, happiness and confusion from every one of the characters and watched as they crossed off the benchmark moments of life; education, drinking age, learning to drive, falling in love, graduation, moving out (etc.). The story of Mason’s parents and sister also added for the morality of life whereby you are constantly making choices and learning, never fully knowing what the outcome will be or where it will lead you –Linklater has an innate skill with his characters, he doesn’t just bring one dimension to the surface – he exposes them fully, wounds and all, and Patricia Arquette and regular collaborator Ethan Hawke were the perfect casting for the [humanly] flawed but loving parents. As brave as the move was in casting a young unknown boy whose future you couldn’t predict, it worked; Ellar Coltrane is brilliant and natural as Mason, laid back in a completely unassuming, inviting and altogether familiar way. 

In a mathematical sense it has all the right numbers and operations, quirky, heart warming and different beyond the measure of 12 years – an ageing and aiding soundtrack, brilliant performances and a universal storyline - I’m glad I got to share this cinematic experience with a cinema audience, but I’m saddened that I’m not quite as bowled over as I thought I would be…. I am however putting this down to the fact that this film doesn’t have a literal ending; Mason/Ellar’s boyhood may well be over – we leave him as a young man with a bright and brilliant future ahead of him, making this another beginning in the story of his life. I kind of wish I could be there to watch the next 12 years unfold.

It’s a bittersweet ending to a very sweet film.

Boy oh Boy - to - Man oh Man; 8 out of 10.

The theaters of the future will be bigger and more beautiful than ever before. They will employ expensive presentation formats that cannot be accessed or reproduced in the home (such as, ironically, film prints). And they will still enjoy exclusivity, as studios relearn the tremendous economic value of the staggered release of their products.

The projects that most obviously lend themselves to such distinctions are spectacles. But if history is any guide, all genres, all budgets will follow. Because the cinema of the future will depend not just on grander presentation, but on the emergence of filmmakers inventive enough to command the focused attention of a crowd for hours.

These new voices will emerge just as we despair that there is nothing left to be discovered. As in the early ’90s, when years of bad multiplexing had soured the public on movies, and a young director named Quentin Tarantino ripped through theaters with a profound sense of cinema’s past and an instinct for reclaiming cinema’s rightful place at the head of popular culture.

Never before has a system so willingly embraced the radical teardown of its own formal standards. But no standards means no rules. Whether photochemical or video-based, a film can now look or sound like anything.

It’s unthinkable that extraordinary new work won’t emerge from such an open structure. That’s the part I can’t wait for.
a-bittersweet-life:

I just want to tell you that, despite people who are entitled to their own tastes and will dislike what you do, and some who will dislike who you are, but let’s hold on to our dreams because together we can change the world, and the world needs to be changed. Touching people, making them cry, making them laugh, can change their minds. And changing minds, changes lives slowly, and changing lives means changing the world. Not only politicians and scientists can change it, but artists as well. They’ve been doing it forever. There are no limits to our ambitions except for the ones we build for ourselves and the one people will build for us. In short, I believe everything is possible to those who dream, dare, work and never give up.
Xavier Dolan
(via mentorless)

a-bittersweet-life:

I just want to tell you that, despite people who are entitled to their own tastes and will dislike what you do, and some who will dislike who you are, but let’s hold on to our dreams because together we can change the world, and the world needs to be changed. Touching people, making them cry, making them laugh, can change their minds. And changing minds, changes lives slowly, and changing lives means changing the world. Not only politicians and scientists can change it, but artists as well. They’ve been doing it forever. There are no limits to our ambitions except for the ones we build for ourselves and the one people will build for us. In short, I believe everything is possible to those who dream, dare, work and never give up.

Xavier Dolan

(via mentorless)

bbook:

I read a lot of books and articles about women’s experiences and roles in the world of technology from 1900 to present day. Women were the first coders. At the time, it was a really low-level job, and as soon as they started to get respect for it then it became a man’s job and they got demoted back down to secretaries. There were a lot of women in the tech industry because it was this totally innovative thing and now…I really want someone to explain to me why this has happened – what are we doing and what are we telling our girls? How is this still such a viral thing that we are discouraging our girls to follow math and science and engineering and technology? There is this organization called “Girls Who Code” that we [the show] have some kind of affiliation with. And it’s basically just reinforcing at the young age of middle school that 74% of girls express a really strong interest in math, tech, engineering and computer science, and then only 7% of them choose it as a major when they are in undergrad. That’s like an enormous gulf! So “Girls Who Code” gets in at this crucial time and creates a space and classes for girls to explore their interests.
Mackenzie Davis on AMC’s New Show HALT AND CATCH FIRE

bbook:

I read a lot of books and articles about women’s experiences and roles in the world of technology from 1900 to present day. Women were the first coders. At the time, it was a really low-level job, and as soon as they started to get respect for it then it became a man’s job and they got demoted back down to secretaries. There were a lot of women in the tech industry because it was this totally innovative thing and now…I really want someone to explain to me why this has happened – what are we doing and what are we telling our girls? How is this still such a viral thing that we are discouraging our girls to follow math and science and engineering and technology? There is this organization called “Girls Who Code” that we [the show] have some kind of affiliation with. And it’s basically just reinforcing at the young age of middle school that 74% of girls express a really strong interest in math, tech, engineering and computer science, and then only 7% of them choose it as a major when they are in undergrad. That’s like an enormous gulf! So “Girls Who Code” gets in at this crucial time and creates a space and classes for girls to explore their interests.

Mackenzie Davis on AMC’s New Show HALT AND CATCH FIRE

tastefullyoffensive:

The worst. [deathbulge]

THIS IS MY LIFE AND IT HURTS SO BAD.

tastefullyoffensive:

The worst. [deathbulge]

THIS IS MY LIFE AND IT HURTS SO BAD.

oldfilmsflicker:

These are movies that are out now or opening throughout the summer that are directed or co-directed by women.

  • Belle - Amma Asante
  • Palo Alto - Gia Coppola
  • Night Moves  - Kelly Reichardt
  • Obvious Child - Gillian Robespierre
  • Elena - Petra Costa
  • Los insólitos peces gato (The Amazing Catfish) - Claudia Sainte-Luce
  • Jupiter Ascending - Andy Wachowski, Lana Wachowski
  • Step Up All In - Trish Sie

derekzane:

Bill Murray on the Late Show through the years.

BEST. 

assassins-and-rookies:

Women of Marvel, stand to unite! Fight for what you believe! We gain more power as our numbers slowly grow, so unite!

nationalfilmsociety:

Ghostbusters

God Bless Rick Moranis.