Happy Birthday M. Shadows, you’ll never know how important you and your band are to me.

FoREVer. #33

INFINITE LOVE FOR CHRIS PRATT/ANDY DWYER/STAR LORD/GOOD GUY. 

To know me, is to know that is is actually one of my wishes. Love this ending. 

THE SKELETON TWINS (2014)

Director: Craig Johnson

Writer: Mark Haywood, Craig Johnson

Cast: Kristen Wiig, Bill Hader, Luke Wilson, Ty Burrell

In Cinemas Autumn 2014

THE ONE I LOVE (2014)

Director:  Charlie McDowell 

Writer: Justin Lader

Cast: Mark Duplass, Elisabeth Moss, Ted Danson

UK Release scheduled for early 2015

keyframedaily:

"What would he say if someone wanted to remake, say, Eraserhead? ‘If they were near me I might shoot them. If I had a gun.’”
David Lynch.

keyframedaily:

"What would he say if someone wanted to remake, say, Eraserhead? ‘If they were near me I might shoot them. If I had a gun.’”

David Lynch.

NIGHTCRAWLER (2014)

Director: Dan Gilroy

Writer: Dan Gilroy

Cast: Jake Gyllenhaal, Bill Paxton

In Cinema October 17.

nolanfans:

Chris Nolan and Matthew McConaughey appears at San Diego Comic-Con during the Paramount panel | 24.07.2014

YESSSSSSS.

I’ve been a little neglectful towards my blog over the last month or so, but I’m going to make sure I get back into the swing of blogging and uploading reviews/trailers. You’ve been warned. 

E. x

sweetheartsandcharacters:

R.I.P James Garner (April 7, 1928-July 19, 2014).


Times Square. Photographed by Frank Larson. (1954)
Times Square. Photographed by Frank Larson. (1954)

geofframscy:

notthebatman:

THAT MOMENT WHEN SEVEN CELEBRITIES CALL OUT ROBIN THICKE ON NATIONAL TELEVISION AND MAKE YOU FEEL LESS ALONE

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=htYOgDs6ROE&feature=kp

BOYHOOD (2014).
Director: Richard Linklater
Writer: Richard Linklater
Cast: Ellar Coltrane, Patricia Arquette, Ethan Hawke, Lorelai Linklater
Imdb Synopsis: The life of a young man, Mason, from age 5 to age 18
-
I don’t think you can deny the charm and ploy of the concept of Boyhood – a real live life flashing before your eyes: the innocence of youth and the awkward discoveries of your teens, all captured on film for the world to see; it’s a novel idea and one that sits nicely with Linklater; if anyone could convincingly sell this behemoth film then of course it would be the man who part steers the Before ship (and oh how I love that ship) – a set of films which also deal with the passing of time. I enjoyed it, despite its immeasurably long running time, but I don’t think I’m as blown away by it as everyone else seems to be. I can understand why it is a precious and historic film and how fresh and different it is; I instantly became attached to Mason and his family and his growth continued to surprise and enchant me – I recognised moments of pain, happiness and confusion from every one of the characters and watched as they crossed off the benchmark moments of life; education, drinking age, learning to drive, falling in love, graduation, moving out (etc.). The story of Mason’s parents and sister also added for the morality of life whereby you are constantly making choices and learning, never fully knowing what the outcome will be or where it will lead you –Linklater has an innate skill with his characters, he doesn’t just bring one dimension to the surface – he exposes them fully, wounds and all, and Patricia Arquette and regular collaborator Ethan Hawke were the perfect casting for the [humanly] flawed but loving parents. As brave as the move was in casting a young unknown boy whose future you couldn’t predict, it worked; Ellar Coltrane is brilliant and natural as Mason, laid back in a completely unassuming, inviting and altogether familiar way. 
In a mathematical sense it has all the right numbers and operations, quirky, heart warming and different beyond the measure of 12 years – an ageing and aiding soundtrack, brilliant performances and a universal storyline - I’m glad I got to share this cinematic experience with a cinema audience, but I’m saddened that I’m not quite as bowled over as I thought I would be…. I am however putting this down to the fact that this film doesn’t have a literal ending; Mason/Ellar’s boyhood may well be over – we leave him as a young man with a bright and brilliant future ahead of him, making this another beginning in the story of his life. I kind of wish I could be there to watch the next 12 years unfold.
It’s a bittersweet ending to a very sweet film.

Boy oh Boy - to - Man oh Man; 8 out of 10.

BOYHOOD (2014).

Director: Richard Linklater

Writer: Richard Linklater

Cast: Ellar Coltrane, Patricia Arquette, Ethan Hawke, Lorelai Linklater

Imdb Synopsis: The life of a young man, Mason, from age 5 to age 18

-

I don’t think you can deny the charm and ploy of the concept of Boyhood – a real live life flashing before your eyes: the innocence of youth and the awkward discoveries of your teens, all captured on film for the world to see; it’s a novel idea and one that sits nicely with Linklater; if anyone could convincingly sell this behemoth film then of course it would be the man who part steers the Before ship (and oh how I love that ship) – a set of films which also deal with the passing of time. I enjoyed it, despite its immeasurably long running time, but I don’t think I’m as blown away by it as everyone else seems to be. I can understand why it is a precious and historic film and how fresh and different it is; I instantly became attached to Mason and his family and his growth continued to surprise and enchant me – I recognised moments of pain, happiness and confusion from every one of the characters and watched as they crossed off the benchmark moments of life; education, drinking age, learning to drive, falling in love, graduation, moving out (etc.). The story of Mason’s parents and sister also added for the morality of life whereby you are constantly making choices and learning, never fully knowing what the outcome will be or where it will lead you –Linklater has an innate skill with his characters, he doesn’t just bring one dimension to the surface – he exposes them fully, wounds and all, and Patricia Arquette and regular collaborator Ethan Hawke were the perfect casting for the [humanly] flawed but loving parents. As brave as the move was in casting a young unknown boy whose future you couldn’t predict, it worked; Ellar Coltrane is brilliant and natural as Mason, laid back in a completely unassuming, inviting and altogether familiar way. 

In a mathematical sense it has all the right numbers and operations, quirky, heart warming and different beyond the measure of 12 years – an ageing and aiding soundtrack, brilliant performances and a universal storyline - I’m glad I got to share this cinematic experience with a cinema audience, but I’m saddened that I’m not quite as bowled over as I thought I would be…. I am however putting this down to the fact that this film doesn’t have a literal ending; Mason/Ellar’s boyhood may well be over – we leave him as a young man with a bright and brilliant future ahead of him, making this another beginning in the story of his life. I kind of wish I could be there to watch the next 12 years unfold.

It’s a bittersweet ending to a very sweet film.

Boy oh Boy - to - Man oh Man; 8 out of 10.

The theaters of the future will be bigger and more beautiful than ever before. They will employ expensive presentation formats that cannot be accessed or reproduced in the home (such as, ironically, film prints). And they will still enjoy exclusivity, as studios relearn the tremendous economic value of the staggered release of their products.

The projects that most obviously lend themselves to such distinctions are spectacles. But if history is any guide, all genres, all budgets will follow. Because the cinema of the future will depend not just on grander presentation, but on the emergence of filmmakers inventive enough to command the focused attention of a crowd for hours.

These new voices will emerge just as we despair that there is nothing left to be discovered. As in the early ’90s, when years of bad multiplexing had soured the public on movies, and a young director named Quentin Tarantino ripped through theaters with a profound sense of cinema’s past and an instinct for reclaiming cinema’s rightful place at the head of popular culture.

Never before has a system so willingly embraced the radical teardown of its own formal standards. But no standards means no rules. Whether photochemical or video-based, a film can now look or sound like anything.

It’s unthinkable that extraordinary new work won’t emerge from such an open structure. That’s the part I can’t wait for.